Indicator air

Ozone immissions

Ozone is one of the strongest oxidising agents and irritant gases in existence. It attacks human, animal and plant tissues and materials. In human beings it most noticeably affects the respiratory tract and lung tissue. In plants, high concentrations of ozone cause visible damage to leaves. If high concentrations of ozone persist for lengthy periods, this causes harvest losses in the agricultural sector. Acidic pollutants and photo-oxidants also attack buildings, monuments and other materials, resulting in bleaching and general deterioration. Ground-level ozone is a secondary pollutant which is formed from nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds under the influence of sunlight.

Assessment of the state
poor poor
Assessment of the trend
positive positive
Immission limit value 2018: 100 Immission limit value 2017: 100 Immission limit value 2016: 100 Immission limit value 2015: 100 Immission limit value 2014: 100 Immission limit value 2013: 100 Immission limit value 2012: 100 Immission limit value 2011: 100 Immission limit value 2010: 100 Immission limit value 2009: 100 Immission limit value 2008: 100 Immission limit value 2007: 100 Immission limit value 2006: 100 Immission limit value 2005: 100 Immission limit value 2004: 100 Immission limit value 2003: 100 Immission limit value 2002: 100 Immission limit value 2001: 100 Immission limit value 2000: 100 Immission limit value 1999: 100 Immission limit value 1998: 100 Immission limit value 1997: 100 Immission limit value 1996: 100 Immission limit value 1995: 100 Immission limit value 1994: 100 Immission limit value 1993: 100 Immission limit value 1992: 100 Immission limit value 1991: 100 north of the Alps 2018: 167.775 north of the Alps 2017: 145.64146 north of the Alps 2016: 139.26 north of the Alps 2015: 169.994 north of the Alps 2014: 143.136 north of the Alps 2013: 155.8248 north of the Alps 2012: 144.398 north of the Alps 2011: 152.54 north of the Alps 2010: 175.852 north of the Alps 2009: 144.636 north of the Alps 2008: 145.356 north of the Alps 2007: 148.92 north of the Alps 2006: 178.588 north of the Alps 2005: 166.766 north of the Alps 2004: 163.366 north of the Alps 2003: 193.874 north of the Alps 2002: 164.118 north of the Alps 2001: 164.32 north of the Alps 2000: 159.824 north of the Alps 1999: 150.014 north of the Alps 1998: 180.866 north of the Alps 1997: 167.504 north of the Alps 1996: 149.982 north of the Alps 1995: 173.448 north of the Alps 1994: 172.708 north of the Alps 1993: 152.26 north of the Alps 1992: 168.356 north of the Alps 1991: 161.786 south of the Alps 2018: 188.257 south of the Alps 2017: 190.7217 south of the Alps 2016: 180.42 south of the Alps 2015: 202.555 south of the Alps 2014: 175.01 south of the Alps 2013: 182.266 south of the Alps 2012: 173.475 south of the Alps 2011: 180.665 south of the Alps 2010: 195.375 south of the Alps 2009: 177.305 south of the Alps 2008: 191.715 south of the Alps 2007: 206.7 south of the Alps 2006: 222.165 south of the Alps 2005: 202.905 south of the Alps 2004: 206.31 south of the Alps 2003: 221.69 south of the Alps 2002: 213.925 south of the Alps 2001: 197.83 south of the Alps 2000: 205.305 south of the Alps 1999: 202.165 south of the Alps 1998: 221.18 south of the Alps 1997: 183.49 south of the Alps 1996: 220.985 south of the Alps 1995: 217.255 south of the Alps 1994: 217.56 south of the Alps 1993: 193.18 south of the Alps 1992: 206.22 south of the Alps 1991: 243.425
Ozone: Maximum monthly 98th percentile in µg/m³

Data for the graph: Excel
Source: FOEN
Comment

Ozone concentrations exceed the limit levels at all measuring stations and thus represent a widespread problem with correspondingly far-reaching consequences. The immissions are connected to the high levels of nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compounds in the air. In Switzerland, as in the majority of central European countries, the immissions of these precursors have decreased significantly in the past few years, as a result of which the limit levels for ozone pollution are also falling. In view of this, the status can be classified as positive. Summer smog can only be combated by massively reducing the precursor pollutants nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compounds at the local, national and international levels, for example by applying the best available technologies to vehicles, industrial and agricultural equipment, and heat generators.

International comparison

The member states of the EU also measure ozone immissions and calculate similar indicators. The level of ozone pollution in Switzerland is similar to that in its neighbouring countries.

Method

The current status and development of air pollution throughout Switzerland are measured and recorded by the National Air Pollution Monitoring Network (NABEL), which is jointly operated by the FOEN and EMPA (Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology). It comprises 16 measurement stations distributed throughout the country, which provide data relating to all the most important pollution situations. For the assessment of ozone immissions, data are collected from NABEL stations with permanent measurement cycles.

Basis for assessment of the trend
Targeted trend Initial value Final value Variation in % Observed trend Assessment
Decrease Average 1991-1993 Average 2016-2018 (1) -12.98%, (2) -6.16%, (3) 0.00% (1) Decrease, (2) Decrease, (3) Stabilisation positive
(1) south of the Alps, (2) north of the Alps, (3) Immission limit value
 
Last updated on: 06.06.2019

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